Visit us on Google+!
Jun
30

Share

Maddie & Tae’s ‘Girl In A Country Song’ Shades Bro-Country In A Wonderful Way

Maddie & Tae

The bro-country bubble might be bursting right before our eyes.With such country classics as “Cruise,” “Boys Round Here” and “Get Me Some Of That” thumpin’ through our speakers and in our hearts, it was only a matter of time before the tides would begin to turn. Sure, TPTB are continuing to claim that all we want to hear is party anthems, but it appears the general music consuming audience has had enough and have entered hangover (aka crisis) mode.

For newcomers Maddie & Tae, the current radio climate has supplied ample material for their new song “Girl In A Country Song,” in which they blast pretty much every bro-country anthem on the planet. By targeting the biggest hits, the duo plants a bulls eye on every laundry-list cliche-ridden fist-pumper Music Row has churned out over the past few years. Ranging from Blake Shelton and Luke Bryan to such newcomers as Tyler Farr and Thomas Rhett, they don’t shy away from telling us exactly how these songs make them feel. Funnily enough, they are signed to Dot Records, under the Big Machine umbrella.

“No country song was harmed in the making of this song,” a voiceover plays in the electric bajo-like intro, a signature way of telling listeners how hip they are. “This is only a test-test-test…”

Then, the lyrics and story (penned by Maddie Marlow, Taelyn Elizabeth Dye and Aaron Scherz) unravel in glorious fashion. “Well I wish I had some shoes on my two bare feet, and it’s gettin’ kinda cold in these painted-on cut-off jeans,” they sing on the opening verse. “I hate the way this bikini top chafes. Do I really have to wear it all day? (Yeah baby.)”

[Thanks to Farce The Music for transcribing the lyrics!]

“I hear you over there on your tailgate whistlin’ sayin’ ‘Hey girl,’ but you know I ain’t listenin’–’cause I got a name and to you it ain’t ‘pretty little thing, honey or baby.’ It’s driving me red red red red red red redneck crazy…”

The chorus gets even better: “Being the girl in a country song–how in the world did it go so wrong? Like all we’re good for is looking good for you and your friends on the weekend, nothin’ more. We used to get a little respect. Now we’re lucky if we even get to climb up in the truck, keep our mouth shut, ride along and be the girl in a country song.”

And then the second verse: “Well, shakin’ my moneymaker ain’t ever made me a dime. And there ain’t no sugar for you in this shaker of mine Tell me one more time you gotta get you some of that. Sure I’ll slide on over, but you’re gonna get slapped. These days it ain’t easy being that…”

Chorus again: “Girl in a country song–how in the world did it go so wrong? Like all we’re good for is looking good for you and your friends on the weekend, nothin’ more. We used to get a little respect. Now we’re lucky if we even get to climb up in the truck, keep our mouth shut, ride along, and be the girl in a country song.”

“Yep, yep, yep,” they coo, before launching into the bridge. “Aw naw, Conway and George Strait never did it this way back in the old days. Aw naw, we ain’t a cliche. That ain’t no way to treat a lady…”

Chorus for the final time–by this point, I have the melody stuck in my head: “Like a girl in a country song–how in the world did it go so wrong? Like all we’re good for is looking good for you and your friends on the weekend, nothin’ more. We used to get a little respect. Now we’re lucky if we even get to climb up in the truck, keep our mouth shut, ride along down some dirt road we don’t even wanna be on and be the girl in a country song.”

Then, comes the hilarious outro, spoken form: “Yeah baby, I ain’t your tan legged Juliet. Can I put on some real clothes now? Aw naw.”

This song is an insightful, introspective narrative that demonstrates the absurdity of mainstream radio. Better yet, it’s cleverly written and produced and should get people talking–not only about the nature of the song itself but also of Maddie & Tae’s storytelling talents. The hook of the song is incredibly catchy and is markedly better than any of the songs it takes to task. It’s a simple approach and doesn’t take itself too seriously, but does it in a way that really hits home.

What is the significance of releasing such a song? And what impact could it possibly have? Well, if anything, it will drive home the detrimental effects bro-country anthems have on the core and values of country music.

Also, it’s pretty damn fun to try to find all the song references. Here are the ones I found:

Florida Georgia Line’s “Cruise”; Billy Currington’s “Hey Girl”; Blake Shelton’s “Boys Round Here”; Tyler Farr’s “Redneck Crazy”; Chris Young’s “Aw Naw”; Luke Bryan’s “Country Girl (Shake It For Me)”; Thomas Rhett’s “Get Me Some Of That”; Dustin Lynch’s “Where It’s At”; Jason Aldean’s “Take A Little Ride”

Can you find any others? Let us know in the comments!

Note: If you have Real Player, VLC or Windows Media Player, open this link by copying and pasting and enjoy: mms://206.53.211.116/verifiedwma/2034521.wma

Also, here is the girls’ EPK, which includes Scott Borchetta (and others) talking about the song:

About Jason Scott

I'm a Nashville transplant by way of West Virginia. I find that country music heals my soul more than anything else, which is what led me to write about it, obsessively. My work has also been featured on Popdust, Country Outfitter, CM Chat Live, NashvilleGab, Examiner.com, Celebuzz and Hollywood Life. Find me on Twitter: @jasonthescott.
This entry was posted in Artist Features, Editorial & Opinion and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Maddie & Tae’s ‘Girl In A Country Song’ Shades Bro-Country In A Wonderful Way

  1. Carrie says:

    Jason! “Hey Girl” by Billy Currington is referenced as well! :) (I also told you this on twitter.) xo

  2. Noah Eaton says:

    As a white, 30-year old heterosexual genderqueer with a biologically male body………..I am absolutely thrilled to see this sort of statement song finally eye release! =D

    There’s nothing wrong with mindless escapism and endless summer fantasizing in song. In fact, there’s also nothing wrong with dressing in daisy dukes, having long tanned legs and bikini tops. But you know you have crossed a line when women (or any demographic) in any genre are reduced to a caricature: so far removed from previous eras where women were celebrated as strong, independent, confident and emotionally enriched individuals such as Loretta Lynn, Kitty Wells and Dolly Parton.

    “Bro-country”, in itself, is not inherently bad. I’ve always stated that. There are plenty of specific “bro-country” songs that don’t regress this way and make for happy-go-lucky ear candy. That said, Music Row and Nashville executives need to hold themselves accountable and respect the fact that women between the ages of 35 and 44 are the genre’s most active listening demographic…………..and start treating them with much, MUCH more respect.

    Hopefully, this song will trigger a breakthrough in terms of breaking the thematic rut on corporate airwaves, and thus begin to render the worst aspects of the sub-genre obsolete! =)

  3. Claudia says:

    Jason Alden my kinda party

  4. Pingback: The Bro-Country Backlash Is Here – The Atlantic | Best Head Phones Mart

  5. Abby Tanner says:

    Jake Owen’s “Barefoot Blue Jean Night”

  6. Jenn says:

    FGL’s “Get Your Shine On”

  7. karen says:

    As a female i love bro country… I think this song was also written to be light hearted though

Share your voice!