GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE Version 2, June 1991 Copyright (C) 1989, 1991 Free Software Foundation, Inc. 51 Franklin St, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA 02110, USA Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies of this license document, but changing it is not allowed. Preamble The licenses for most software are designed to take away your freedom to share and change it. By contrast, the GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to share and change free software--to make sure the software is free for all its users. This General Public License applies to most of the Free Software Foundation's software and to any other program whose authors commit to using it. (Some other Free Software Foundation software is covered by the GNU Library General Public License instead.) You can apply it to your programs, too. When we speak of free software, we are referring to freedom, not price. Our General Public Licenses are designed to make sure that you have the freedom to distribute copies of free software (and charge for this service if you wish), that you receive source code or can get it if you want it, that you can change the software or use pieces of it in new free programs; and that you know you can do these things. To protect your rights, we need to make restrictions that forbid anyone to deny you these rights or to ask you to surrender the rights. These restrictions translate to certain responsibilities for you if you distribute copies of the software, or if you modify it. For example, if you distribute copies of such a program, whether gratis or for a fee, you must give the recipients all the rights that you have. You must make sure that they, too, receive or can get the source code. And you must show them these terms so they know their rights. We protect your rights with two steps: (1) copyright the software, and (2) offer you this license which gives you legal permission to copy, distribute and/or modify the software. Also, for each author's protection and ours, we want to make certain that everyone understands that there is no warranty for this free software. If the software is modified by someone else and passed on, we want its recipients to know that what they have is not the original, so that any problems introduced by others will not reflect on the original authors' reputations. Finally, any free program is threatened constantly by software patents. We wish to avoid the danger that redistributors of a free program will individually obtain patent licenses, in effect making the program proprietary. To prevent this, we have made it clear that any patent must be licensed for everyone's free use or not licensed at all. The precise terms and conditions for copying, distribution and modification follow. GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COPYING, DISTRIBUTION AND MODIFICATION 0. This License applies to any program or other work which contains a notice placed by the copyright holder saying it may be distributed under the terms of this General Public License. The "Program", below, refers to any such program or work, and a "work based on the Program" means either the Program or any derivative work under copyright law: that is to say, a work containing the Program or a portion of it, either verbatim or with modifications and/or translated into another language. (Hereinafter, translation is included without limitation in the term "modification".) Each licensee is addressed as "you". Activities other than copying, distribution and modification are not covered by this License; they are outside its scope. The act of running the Program is not restricted, and the output from the Program is covered only if its contents constitute a work based on the Program (independent of having been made by running the Program). Whether that is true depends on what the Program does. Album Reviews | For The Country Record
Aug
20

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Lydia Loveless ‘Real’ – Album Review

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The first time I heard “Bilbao” from Lydia Loveless’ new album ‘Real,’ it was like I was hearing a voice repeating inside my head. As I felt the emotions swelling, I could hear the whispered line from 10cc’s great pop song “I’m Not In Love” repeating “Big boys don’t cry… big boys don’t cry.” The reverie puts you in a trance and when things come to a climactic bridge, her voice soars to majestic heights, wrapped around a wall of sound that feels like she’s reaching the pinnacle of her career. And when she comes back with a killer one-lite fade out, it just about does you in, in a few spectacular minutes that sum up all the attributes of the great expansiveness of ‘Real.’ I just cried inside – I admit it.

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Aug
16

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Dolly Parton ‘Pure and Simple’ – Album Review

Pure and Simple

Reviewing your all-time favorite artist can sometimes produce a crisis of confidence. On the one hand, you know you are biased to love everything that artist produces, while on the other, you know you have incredibly high standards for anything new that arrives. It can therefore be nerve-wracking when new music is released, leading to disappointment as often as automatic adoration. No artist can continue on an upward trend of quality because no artist is perfect, and such contemplation can also leave the reviewer tangled up in judging the validity of their own reactions.

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Jul
22

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FEATURED: Acoustic Journey ‘Get Back Up’ EP

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There are two sides to the UK country music scene. There are the acts that are signed to major labels, or at least close to it, touring substantially inside and outside the UK, playing festivals and even appearing on television. Such acts include The Shires, Ward Thomas, Jess and The Bandits and Sasha McVeigh. However, there is also a quickly growing scene of homegrown songwriters and musicians who are making a decent part-time living playing small local venues around the UK, releasing EPs to iTunes and to sell at shows, and engaging in a rough-and-ready DIY collective that puts them on the same level as their fans. One of these such acts is Acoustic Journey, an all-male three-piece from Northamptonshire. Between Andrew Jones (lead vocals, rhythm guitar), Ben Gurney (songwriting, lead guitar, harmonies) and Andy Sammons (harmonies, cajon), the trio provide sparse, acoustic-orientated arrangements set to easy-rolling songs touching on love, heartbreak, and the realities of a simple working class lifestyle.

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May
23

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Dierks Bentley ‘Black’ – Album Review

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After the personal emotional outpouring of ‘Riser’ that was the perfect mainstream album, I, and many others, were curious and cautious as to what Dierks Bentley would release as a follow up. Using the trendy tactic of promotional videos to tease new material, Dierks released ‘Somewhere On A Beach’ (the lead single), ‘I’ll Be The Moon (feat. Maren Morris)’, ‘What The Hell Did I Say’, ‘Pick Up’ and finally, ‘Black’ in the lead up to this week’s album release.

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May
6

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Ryan Beaver ‘Rx’ – Album Review

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From the opening down-strum bar chords of empowerment anthem ‘Dark’, it’s clear that a special album is about to unfold. “Way out here, you can feel it coming,” Ryan sings in the record’s first line, his voice inflected with grit but beholding a strength that doesn’t truly unleash until the song’s climax. “I ain’t afraid of the dark,” he belts, setting out the soaring statement for an album that is defined by its highs and lows. On ‘Rx’, Ryan flirts with pain and darkness but ultimately arrives triumphant, stronger for the hardship endured.

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Apr
12

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Sturgill Simpson ‘A Sailor’s Guide To Earth’ – Album Review

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Sturgill Simpson hasn’t shown us what he’s about yet. His debut ‘High Top Mountain’ introduced him as a sincere writer with a voice to stretch the generations without taking a lot of risk. ‘Metamodern Sounds In Country Music’ took us down a different path, taking his traditional sound and warping it into something so much more interesting with his innovative writing and the ballsy production by Dave Cobb. For ‘A Sailor’s Guide To Earth’, Sturgill has taken over the reigns fully, writing and producing the whole album himself, and thus exposing much more about who he is as a musician. I’m always impressed by musicians producing their records because whilst writing is hugely important, the production quality can break a great poem, or lift an average lyric to different heights.

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Apr
7

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Hayes Carll ‘Lovers & Leavers’ – Album Review

Hayes Carll, Lovers And Leavers (LabelTK/Thirty Tigers 2016)

(LabelTK/Thirty Tigers 2016)

I was first introduced to Hayes Carll through my great love of Lee Ann Womack. Being the writer of ‘Chances Are’, one of the real highlights of ‘The Way I’m Livin’’, Hayes immediately became one of my favourite songwriters, portraying an authenticity and beauty that great music should. It has taken me a while to delve into his own records, but I am pleased to say ‘Lovers & Leavers’ is a fantastic introduction into the sincere music of Hayes Carll.

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Apr
1

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William Michael Morgan – EP Review

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Mississippi native William Michael Morgan is an up and coming country artist who has already made quite the impression on the industry and critics alike with his debut single, “I Met A Girl”, which has reached number 34 on the Country Airplay chart. The song was written and performed by Sam Hunt, but Morgan made it his own and can lay claim to the best version. The single is a sweet, slow building love song, made even better by Morgan’s rich, pure country vocals. Morgan recently released his debut self-titled EP earlier this month. The record is a breath of fresh traditional country air in a scene that is currently clogged up with R&B and hip-hop influences.

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