GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE Version 2, June 1991 Copyright (C) 1989, 1991 Free Software Foundation, Inc. 51 Franklin St, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA 02110, USA Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies of this license document, but changing it is not allowed. Preamble The licenses for most software are designed to take away your freedom to share and change it. By contrast, the GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to share and change free software--to make sure the software is free for all its users. This General Public License applies to most of the Free Software Foundation's software and to any other program whose authors commit to using it. (Some other Free Software Foundation software is covered by the GNU Library General Public License instead.) You can apply it to your programs, too. When we speak of free software, we are referring to freedom, not price. Our General Public Licenses are designed to make sure that you have the freedom to distribute copies of free software (and charge for this service if you wish), that you receive source code or can get it if you want it, that you can change the software or use pieces of it in new free programs; and that you know you can do these things. To protect your rights, we need to make restrictions that forbid anyone to deny you these rights or to ask you to surrender the rights. These restrictions translate to certain responsibilities for you if you distribute copies of the software, or if you modify it. For example, if you distribute copies of such a program, whether gratis or for a fee, you must give the recipients all the rights that you have. You must make sure that they, too, receive or can get the source code. And you must show them these terms so they know their rights. We protect your rights with two steps: (1) copyright the software, and (2) offer you this license which gives you legal permission to copy, distribute and/or modify the software. Also, for each author's protection and ours, we want to make certain that everyone understands that there is no warranty for this free software. If the software is modified by someone else and passed on, we want its recipients to know that what they have is not the original, so that any problems introduced by others will not reflect on the original authors' reputations. Finally, any free program is threatened constantly by software patents. We wish to avoid the danger that redistributors of a free program will individually obtain patent licenses, in effect making the program proprietary. To prevent this, we have made it clear that any patent must be licensed for everyone's free use or not licensed at all. The precise terms and conditions for copying, distribution and modification follow. GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COPYING, DISTRIBUTION AND MODIFICATION 0. This License applies to any program or other work which contains a notice placed by the copyright holder saying it may be distributed under the terms of this General Public License. The "Program", below, refers to any such program or work, and a "work based on the Program" means either the Program or any derivative work under copyright law: that is to say, a work containing the Program or a portion of it, either verbatim or with modifications and/or translated into another language. (Hereinafter, translation is included without limitation in the term "modification".) Each licensee is addressed as "you". Activities other than copying, distribution and modification are not covered by this License; they are outside its scope. The act of running the Program is not restricted, and the output from the Program is covered only if its contents constitute a work based on the Program (independent of having been made by running the Program). Whether that is true depends on what the Program does. Buddy Miller | For The Country Record | Page 2

Tag Archives: Buddy Miller

Sep
16

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Michelle Malone’s Hot ‘Lanta: The Buddy & Jim Show Recap

Michelle Malone surely would not describe herself as a Georgia peach but she is one proud native of Atlanta.

The singer, who hails from Buckhead in the northern part of the city, remembers sneaking in to see the Georgia Satellites when she was growing up and leaving a lifelong impression. Playing bluesy and soulful Georgia roots music covers a lot of genres. “There’s a great scene in Atlanta and to me it’s a family thing. It’s hard to put a finger on what that Georgia music thing is but a lot of the music that comes from there is really raw and honest.”

Malone was in to reflect on her nearly thirty-year career with Buddy Miller and Jim Lauderdale on their weekly radio show, the Buddy & Jim Show on SiriusXM Outlaw Country. Malone has a new album “Stronger Than You Think” and played songs from it accompanied by Reno Roberts, a friend who is from Ft. Page, Alabama and now lives in Huntsville.

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Aug
12

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Remembering Buddy Emmons, “The Big E” & His Heart of Steel: The Buddy & Jim Show Recap

One night steel guitarist Buddy Emmons got a call from Glen Campbell who wanted to know if was interested in cutting some Ray Charles tracks that night. When Emmons got to the session he assumed it was for Campbell until he saw Charles walking out into the studio. Later on Emmons would play onstage in Nashville with Charles. “You could hear your name a million times,” Emmons would run in the Steel Guitar Forum the night Charles passed away, “but you never get used to hearing Ray Charles introducing your name to an audience.”

The world lost Buddy Emmons July 21 and folks would agree that he did more to call attention to the instrument and innovation. The re-airing of a Buddy & Jim Show special on SiriusXM Outlaw Country seemed like a perfect opportunity to celebrate the more than fifty years of the man affectionately known as “The Big E.”

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Jul
11

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Gurf Morlix’s Tales From Buffalo and Austin: The Buddy & Jim Show Recap

“Even though the air was dirty back then, I think you turned out pretty good.”

So said Jim Lauderdale who had just come out of playing “Dirty Old Buffalo” by Gurf Morlix, the noted Austin singer, songwriter and producer who grew up on the East End of Lake Erie, about fifteen miles from downtown Buffalo. The song, which draws from inspiration of growing up on his most recent album Eatin’ At Me, has the feel of a movie soundtrack and led into a long conversation about Morlix’s storied life on a recent episode of The Buddy & Jim Show on SiriusXM Outlaw Country.

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Jul
7

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Larry & Teresa Heed The Advice of Friends: The Buddy & Jim Show Recap

For years, Buddy Miller and his wife Julie had been urging their dear friends Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams to make a record. And now after years of cajoling, they finally have.

Their deep friendship goes back to the country music scene in New York in the Eighties when Campbell played steel guitar in Miller’s band and a South Carolinian new to the city by the name of Jim Lauderdale approached and asked, “Y’all mind if I come up and sign a song with you?”

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Jun
15

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‘Larry Campbell & Teresa Williams’ & All The Years In The Making – Interview

Larry-teresa

The first time I met Larry Campbell he had a guitar in his hands. It was in the backyard of my grandmother’s’ house in Yonkers, NY, the place I liked to go the most as a child. I met so many people on my Mom’s side of the family that magical day. But I learned there was a big difference between he and I in the more than five years that separated us. While I was getting my babysitters to sneak their older sisters’ Beatles records to my house, my cousin was actually seeing them and could say he was there at Shea Stadium on what would be the Beatles’ last tour.

If I could have photoshopped the picture of Larry on that August day, there might have been a crystal ball on the table in front of him. When he peered in he’d be able to see himself playing one day with the same people he was then going to see  as a teenager in his hometown of New York City – Bob Dylan, members of the Jefferson Airplane, the Band and the Grateful Dead. He also might have seen himself finishing a song from lyrics that Hank Williams left in the back of his car when he died one night in 1953. And he would also see the image of the future love his life on the cover of the record they would make together. The only thing is that it would take decades to occur – and the calendar would have to go into the next century until its release on the 23rd of June in the year 2015.

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May
27

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Melba Montgomery’s Country Life Stories: The Buddy & Jim Show Recap

It might have been the golden age of country but Melba Montgomery said you never saw a tour bus no matter how big a star you were. The first time she was working with longtime duo partner George Jones she remembers him pulling up with his band, their equipment hitched to the back of a station wagon. When George found out she bought a Cadillac, he announced that he was going to be riding with her the rest of the tour.

Sometimes it seemed that she and Jones would sing for hours going down the road, Montgomery recounted to Buddy Miller and Jim Lauderdale on a recent episode of the Buddy & Jim Show on SiriusXM Outlaw Country radio. There’d be some seven hundred miles to go and sometimes a 1:30 matinee awaiting them. Jones sat in the middle backseat with his guitar, Montgomery on her knees behind the passenger seat and they sang all night long. “I had my brother driving and we made sure we kept him up.”

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May
22

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Emmylou & Rodney’s Long Road and The Friends They Made Along The Way: The Buddy & Jim Show Recap

Emmylou_Harris_Rodney_Crowell_3_©Cindy_Dyer

“That’s a new classic right there.”

If Jim Lauderdale paused to say the words, it was because he was in awe coming out of Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell’s performance of “The Traveling Kind,” the title track of their new album which they sang for listeners of the Buddy and Jim Show on SiriusXM Outlaw Country.

“Every once in a while you catch something that is timeless,” Crowell reflected. “I felt like we tapped into some form of timelessness. If we’re lucky enough to leave something that lasts after us, what more could you ask for?”

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May
19

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‘Monterey,’ Mysteries & The Ghosts Chasing The Milk Carton Kids: The Buddy & Jim Show Recap

Kenneth Pattengale & Joey Ryan of The Milk Carton Kids

If you want to create a mystique about your band, take a page from the Milk Carton Kids.

“We don’t have a bio,” Joey Ryan was saying about his five year partnership with Kenneth Pattengale, the other half of the acoustic duo who is prone to shying away from interviews.  “Everybody still asks us ‘How did you guys meet?’ so I finally decided to prepare something to fuel the creation myth.”

The duo, winners of the best duo/group at last Fall’s Americana Music Association Awards, was on the Buddy & Jim Show hosted by Buddy Miller and Jim Lauderdale on SiriusXM Outlaw Country. They played songs from their new album “Monterey,” talked about their upcoming tour and discussed the ghost sighting Pattengale recently experienced on his home security system.

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