GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE Version 2, June 1991 Copyright (C) 1989, 1991 Free Software Foundation, Inc. 51 Franklin St, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA 02110, USA Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies of this license document, but changing it is not allowed. Preamble The licenses for most software are designed to take away your freedom to share and change it. By contrast, the GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to share and change free software--to make sure the software is free for all its users. This General Public License applies to most of the Free Software Foundation's software and to any other program whose authors commit to using it. (Some other Free Software Foundation software is covered by the GNU Library General Public License instead.) You can apply it to your programs, too. When we speak of free software, we are referring to freedom, not price. Our General Public Licenses are designed to make sure that you have the freedom to distribute copies of free software (and charge for this service if you wish), that you receive source code or can get it if you want it, that you can change the software or use pieces of it in new free programs; and that you know you can do these things. To protect your rights, we need to make restrictions that forbid anyone to deny you these rights or to ask you to surrender the rights. These restrictions translate to certain responsibilities for you if you distribute copies of the software, or if you modify it. For example, if you distribute copies of such a program, whether gratis or for a fee, you must give the recipients all the rights that you have. You must make sure that they, too, receive or can get the source code. And you must show them these terms so they know their rights. We protect your rights with two steps: (1) copyright the software, and (2) offer you this license which gives you legal permission to copy, distribute and/or modify the software. Also, for each author's protection and ours, we want to make certain that everyone understands that there is no warranty for this free software. If the software is modified by someone else and passed on, we want its recipients to know that what they have is not the original, so that any problems introduced by others will not reflect on the original authors' reputations. Finally, any free program is threatened constantly by software patents. We wish to avoid the danger that redistributors of a free program will individually obtain patent licenses, in effect making the program proprietary. To prevent this, we have made it clear that any patent must be licensed for everyone's free use or not licensed at all. The precise terms and conditions for copying, distribution and modification follow. GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COPYING, DISTRIBUTION AND MODIFICATION 0. This License applies to any program or other work which contains a notice placed by the copyright holder saying it may be distributed under the terms of this General Public License. The "Program", below, refers to any such program or work, and a "work based on the Program" means either the Program or any derivative work under copyright law: that is to say, a work containing the Program or a portion of it, either verbatim or with modifications and/or translated into another language. (Hereinafter, translation is included without limitation in the term "modification".) Each licensee is addressed as "you". Activities other than copying, distribution and modification are not covered by this License; they are outside its scope. The act of running the Program is not restricted, and the output from the Program is covered only if its contents constitute a work based on the Program (independent of having been made by running the Program). Whether that is true depends on what the Program does. Taylor Swift | For The Country Record | Page 2

Tag Archives: Taylor Swift

Nov
17

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Why I Disagree With Taylor Swift’s Thoughts On Streaming, And Free “Art”

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As you may have heard by now, Taylor Swift removed her entire back catalogue from Spotify.

Some people probably saw it coming. After all, she published an op-ed piece in the Wall Street Journal earlier this year about the future of the music industry, and how art has value and should not be free. She dismissed piracy and streaming services, despite the fact she had earned $6 million from Spotify with her first four albums and various extra material, and when ‘1989’ finally hit shelves it was nowhere to be seen on the global service. A week following its release (once first week sales had come in) many were surprised when it still didn’t turn up there, but Taylor really hit headlines when instead of adding ‘1989’ to Spotify she pulled everything of hers from it. Every last album and song. Just gone.

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Oct
28

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iTunes UK Country Chart Roundup – Week of 28th October, 2014

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I find it curious that on iTunes UK Taylor Swift’s latest album ‘1989’ (officially designated as pop) only makes itself known on the pop charts, whereas for the past several weeks ‘Shake It Off’ and various other promo tracks have dominated Country Songs. Of course this is the week of the release of ‘1989’ and the world has gone ape, leading to a plethora of Swift’s back catalogue littering the top 10 of Country Albums. ‘Red’ is at the helm while its deluxe version is down at #3, bested by ‘Fearless’ at #2 but proving more popular than ‘Speak Now (Bonus Track Version)’ at #4. Also selling well is ‘Taylor Swift’ (#6), ‘Fearless (Platinum Edition)’ (#7), and ‘Speak Now (Extended Version)’ (#17). That makes a whopping seven entries in the top 20, six of which are comfortably in the top 10. Not bad eh?

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Oct
14

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iTunes UK Country Chart Roundup – Week of 14th October, 2014

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Once more the popularity of Lady Antebellum in the UK has given them a second week at #1 with ‘747 (Deluxe)’, while ‘Need You Now’ takes #2 and the standard edition of ‘747’ takes #3. ‘Golden’ is back on the chart too, notching up a #13 spot. Taylor Swift is also inching up the Country Albums chart this week in advance of the release of ‘1989’ in a fortnight’s time, with ‘Red’ and its deluxe version coming in at #4 and #5, while ‘Fearless (Platinum Edition)’ is at #7. Outside of the top 10 she’s also dominating, with ‘Taylor Swift’ moving up to #15, ‘Speak Now (Bonus Track Version)’ at #21, ‘Fearless’ at #22 and ‘Speak Now (Extended Version)’ at #23.

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Sep
22

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Why Comparisons Between Kacey Musgraves and Taylor Swift Annoy Me

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When Kacey Musgraves first released her major label debut ‘Same Trailer Different Park’ back in March 2013, it wasn’t long before I began hearing people compare her to Taylor Swift. The comparisons have continued as Kacey supposedly beat previous favorite Taylor to win Best Country Album at this year’s Grammys, and even though Taylor has officially gone pop now (even she said so herself), their names often remain in the same sentence when mentioned in the press. Now, I know there is plenty of awful press out there that doesn’t know what it’s talking about (for example, a quick Google resulted in a gossip site referring to Kacey as a “teenage country singer”… dated this year. She’s 26, and actually older than 24-year-old Taylor, even though the site referred to Kacey as younger), but these comparisons have occurred enough to get under my skin. Just what makes them so similar?

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Aug
25

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GUEST POST: Taylor Swift Departs From Country – What Now?

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By Andy Macbride

So there we have it: Taylor Swift’s new album ‘1989’, her “first documented, official pop album.” For an artist who made her big break via country music with hits such as ‘Tim McGraw’, ‘Love Story’ and ‘Picture To Burn’ it is quite the departure from the frizzy-haired sixteen year old that burst on the scene in 2006. So where does this leave Taylor and country music in general?

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Aug
19

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iTunes UK Country Chart Roundup – Week of 19th August, 2014

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Wow, this is getting to be a bit of a broken record isn’t it? Dolly Parton’s at #1 again this week with ‘Blue Smoke’, backed by Ward Thomas’ ‘From Where We Stand’ at #2 and Dolly’s own ‘The Very Best of’ at #3. John Denver is close behind with ‘The Ultimate Collection’ at #4 and a couple of compilation albums litter the top 10. Actually at #10 itself are mainstays Lady Antebellum with ‘Need You Now’, while Johnny Cash sports four albums in the top 25. Still, the big Taylor Swift livestream announcement last night (revealing her first official pop album ‘1989’) has propelled her previous records higher up the list; helmed by ‘Red’ at #5, it’s almost surprising to see her debut ‘Taylor Swift’ at #6, ‘Fearless (Platinum Edition)’ at #11, ‘Red (Deluxe Version)’ at #22 and ‘Speak Now (Bonus Track Version)’ at #24.

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Aug
12

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iTunes UK Country Chart Roundup – Week of 12th August, 2014

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Despite an influx of New & Noteworthy’s on the iTunes Country main page, this promotion has failed to make much of an impact on the actual sales charts. Country Albums still sees Dolly Parton in charge with ‘Blue Smoke’; while ‘The Very Best Of’ drops one place to #4 this week, Ward Thomas remain at #2 with ‘From Where We Stand’, and ‘American Heartland: Legends of Country’ is a winner at #3. One thing we do see is the rise in profile of Taylor Swift; the announcement of a live stream that will certainly give us details of a new single and her fifth studio album next week has resulted in ‘Red’ sitting at #8, her self-titled release leaping to #11, ‘Fearless (Platinum Edition)’ moving up to #13, ‘Red (Deluxe Version)’ hitting #16 and ‘Speak Now (Bonus Track Version)’ coming in at #17. This is by far the biggest week she has had on this chart for some months, and it gives us a taste of what is to come leading up to the release of her next album in October-ish.

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Jul
14

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Why Taylor Swift’s WSJ Piece Didn’t Actually Say Anything – A Deconstruction

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Okay, we all know I’m not the biggest fan of Taylor Swift. I’d had my fun criticizing her music and public persona back in the beginning of this blog, and about 18 months ago I decided to ease right off, because it was getting dull for me, dull for you guys, and despite what many people think I’m not one to live in hatred. I do actually like to listen to music that makes me happy. So I’d become indifferent to Taylor and just popped her in a little box over there and moved on with my life. But then she published a piece on the Wall Street Journal about the future of the music industry, and well, that’s just impeding on my turf, bra. But really, just because you’re a popstar doesn’t mean you have a clue how the industry works, and it doesn’t mean you should be published in the Wall Street Journal for 1200 words on your perception of it. That’s not her job, and she should probably stick to what she knows.

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